DANIEL NAUDÉ - Solo Exhibition

PRESS RELEASE

DANIEL NAUDÉ - Solo Exhibition
Feb 18 – Mar 18, 2022

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As if meeting us from the sea, patiently awaiting our arrival, we encounter them. Mythical. Majestic. These beasts seem to occupy a space and time that is beyond our conception.

The creatures we encounter in this body of work by Daniel Naudé are forceful reminders of our complex relationship with the animal world. Over a period of ten years, Naudé travelled to the beaches of the Wild Coast, South Africa, to photograph the indigenous cattle that frequent these shores.

The process called for patience, with Naudé scouting the area, waiting for a particular animal to be in just the right place at the right time. The release of the camera’s shutter would signal that moment when Naudé would, after careful consideration, transform animal into image.

As with his previous work, a delicate stillness permeates this photographic encounter. The weather and the effect of light on the landscape, as well as the temperament and composure of the animal, are all taken into careful account. 

Naudé explains further: "It is important to approach the landscape and the animal with an open mind. In many ways, it comes down to the process of exploration. I have learned to be receptive and slowly immerse myself in my working environment. I always try to find the balance between mindfulness and abandonment that comes from being in nature. To me, it is a moment of stillness, a place where I am able to rest with the landscape and the animal."

Naudé engages with the highly emotive relationship between human and animal – a theme that is embodied in much of his work to date. The wonder of his photographic practice lies in his ability to set up an intimate visual encounter between human viewer and animal subject. For Naudé, there is a vibrant energy that comes from that moment when he connects with an animal through the lens of his camera. And it is this exact moment of mutual recognition that he wishes to share with the viewer.

Adapted from a text by Dr. Ernst van der Wal, PhD (Visual Arts), Head of Department: Visual Arts, Stellenbosch University